FACTS ABOUT MENINGITIS

Meningitis B is one type of meningococcal disease (frequently referred to as meningitis) caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis. Meningitis can attack the brain and spinal cord and cause swelling in those areas as well as a serious infection of the bloodstream, called septicemia.

Facts About Meningitis B Infection

ABOUT 1 IN 10 INFECTED WITH MENINGITIS WILL DIE, SOMETIMES WITHIN 24 HOURS

Approximately 10% to 15% of people infected with meningococcal disease will die, sometimes as quickly as 24 hours after symptoms appear. For those who survive, about 1 in 5 may experience a variety of long-term disabilities including hearing loss, brain damage and nervous system problems, kidney damage, loss of limbs, and skin scarring.

Historically, there have been five common groups of the bacteria that cause meningococcal disease: A, C, W, Y, and B. Three of these bacterial groups—B, C, and Y—cause most of the meningococcal disease cases in the United States.

MORE THAN 60%

OF MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE CASES THAT OCCURRED IN 16-23 YEAR OLDS ARE MENINGITIS B, according to a 2015-2017 CDC study

[VO] Over the last 24 hours, you finished preparing him for college. In 24 hours, you’ll send him off thinking you’ve done everything for his well-being.

[Text] Symptoms may include severe headache, sudden fever, and stiff neck. Talk to your doctor if you have these symptoms.

[VO] But Meningitis B progresses quickly and can be fatal, sometimes within 24 hours. While Meningitis B is uncommon, about one in 10 infected will die. Like millions of others, your teen may not be vaccinated against Meningitis B. Meningitis B strikes quickly. Be quick to talk to your teen’s doctor about a Meningitis B vaccine.

[Text] Vaccination may not protect all recipients.

THERE ARE TWO TYPES OF MENINGITIS VACCINES

There are currently two different types of vaccines for meningitis — one for groups A, C, W, and Y and another for group B. You or your loved ones may have been vaccinated for meningitis ACWY when you were younger, as it’s recommended for 11 to 12 year olds (plus a booster shot at age 16).

ACWY Meningitis Vaccine

RECOMMENDED FOR 11 TO 12 YEAR OLDS

Meningitis B Vaccine

SUGGESTED FOR 16 TO 23 YEAR OLDS

Since a meningitis B vaccine was not available until 2014, most teenagers have not yet received the vaccine suggested for 16-23 year olds. As a result, millions of teenagers and young adults aren’t vaccinated against meningitis B.