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GET THE FACTS ABOUT MENINGITIS B

WHAT IS MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE?

Meningococcal disease is an uncommon, but serious infection that includes meningococcal meningitis (commonly referred to as meningitis). Meningitis is caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis and is contagious. When it strikes it can progress quickly – usually without warning.

ABOUT 1 IN 10 INFECTED WITH MENINGITIS WILL DIE, SOMETIMES WITHIN 24 HOURS

Survivors can experience a number of long-term disabilities, including brain damage, hearing loss, and loss of limbs.

DID YOUR TEEN GET BOTH MENINGITIS VACCINES - ACWY & B?

Probably not. The meningitis vaccine most teens may have received when they were younger covered meningitis ACWY, not meningitis B. That’s because a meningitis B vaccine wasn’t available until late 2014.

MOST HAVE RECEIVED:

Recommended for 11 to 12 year olds

(plus a booster shot at age 16)

ONLY AVAILABLE SINCE LATE 2014:

Suggested for 16 to 23 year olds

(preferably 16 to 18 year olds)

MILLIONS OF TEENS AND YOUNG ADULTS AREN’T VACCINATED AGAINST MENINGITIS B

HOW IS IT SPREAD?

The bacteria that cause meningitis live within the nose and throat. They can be spread easily through everyday behaviors, including:

Coughing & sneezing

Sharing drinks & eating utensils

Kissing

Living in close quarters

WHO’S AT RISK?

Anyone can get meningitis – however...

16 TO 23 YEAR OLDS FACE A HIGHER RISK

Meningitis is unpredictable. Individual cases occur across the country, many times in high school, college, and military barracks settings.

From January 2015 to November 2016, there were 18 cases, including one death, of meningitis B at colleges or universities in the following states: Oregon, California, Wisconsin, Rhode Island, and New Jersey.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Early symptoms of meningitis may appear mild – similar to those of a cold or the flu. However, symptoms can progress quickly and may include:

Headache

Sudden Fever

Stiff Neck

Additional symptoms may include:

Nausea, vomiting, sensitivity to light, confusion, and a rash (typically dark purple spots on the torso, arms, or legs).

If you’re experiencing these symptoms or have been in close contact with someone who has meningitis, please contact your healthcare professional immediately.

KNOW THE FACTS, BE PREPARED

Here’s a fact sheet about meningitis B to discuss with your healthcare professional.

HELP PROTECT YOUR TEEN WITH MENINGITIS B VACCINATION

Talk to your healthcare professional about meningitis B vaccination. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), keeping up-to-date with recommended vaccines is the best defense against meningitis, although vaccines may not protect all individuals.

LEARN ABOUT A MENINGITIS B VACCINE